Contact

For more information on ASMI’s campaigns to promote Alaskan seafood, please contact the Southern Europe office, located in Barcelona, Spain, to request media information or artwork.

David McClellan

Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute Regional Representative

C/ Borrell 7 – Local 19 08190 St. Cugat del Vallès (Barcelona) Spain

Tel:+34 93 589 8547
Fax:+34 93 589 7051

E-mail: dmcclellan@alaskaseafood.org
Web: www.alaskaseafood.org

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Benefits

It is scientifically proven that vegetable-based diets, such as those of the Mediterranean type, which consist of plant foods (cereals, fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds), fish, shellfish, healthy fats and a limited consumption of red meat , are one of the best dietary approaches for preventing chronic diseases and improving overall health through nutrition.

 

The combination of vegetables and seafood as part of the usual diet creates a synergy of nutrients that fills those nutritional gaps that can occur in poor, sedentary diets …, such as insufficient EPA, DHA, vitamin D and B12, and improves the absorption of essential nutrients that the body needs.

 

Why consume Alaskan seafood?

 

High-quality fish and shellfish are considered to be the richest foods in EPA and DHA in the world, like seafood that lives in the waters of Alaska.

Wild Alaskan salmon contains exceptional nutritional properties that help produce serotonin.

 

THE MAJORITY OF DIETS FOR PREGNANT WOMEN DO NOT PROVIDE THE ADEQUATE AMOUNT OF OMEGA 3 DUE TO THE LOW CONSUMPTION OF FOODS RICH IN THIS FATTY ACID, SUCH AS ALASKA SEAFOOD PRODUCTS

 

Give preference to fish that are high in EPA and DHA, such as salmon, black cod, oysters, Alaskan flea, and Alaskan pollock. Average daily intake should consist of 250 mg of EPA and DHA per day:

  • 100 grams of Alaska king salmon contain 1736 mg EPA / DHA
  • 100 grams of Alaskan sockeye salmon contains 858 mg EPA / DHA
  • 100 grams of Alaska black cod contains 1815 mg EPA / DHA
  • 100 grams of Alaska halibut contains 236 mg EPA / DHA

 

To ensure adequate intake, it is recommended to consume about 125 grams of Alaska seafood, twice a week.

Alaska Seafood is a great source of omega-3 fatty acids (DHA and EPA), which are essential for our bodies to promote heart health, suppress inflammatory responses, improve blood flow, and participate in brain function. It is also naturally rich in essential vitamins and minerals, including vitamins of group A, B12, E and provides high quality protein to keep bones and muscles strong and healthy.

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Staying healthy by eating seafood

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Heart Health Benefits of Eating Fish

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Healthy mothers - healthy babies

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Seafood Safety measures

Benefits of Alaskan Seafood Products

Brain

When the brain suffers, that person’s quality of life suffers. Many people are increasingly concerned about brain health as day-to-day factors such as stress, toxins, poor diet, and aging affect cognitive ability and mood. Some of these measures with changes in lifestyle such as increasing physical activity, maintaining healthy social relationships, participating in mentally stimulating activities, avoiding toxins in our environment and eating a diet based on whole foods rich in nutrients.

ONE OF THE MAIN REASONS WHY SEAFOOD PRODUCTS, ESPECIALLY THE FATEST, CONTRIBUTE TO BRAIN HEALTH, is the fact that they are rich in long-chain omega-3 (omega-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially those eicosapentaenoic acids (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA).

Heart

We’ve all heard that eating more fish is good for reducing the risk of heart disease, but have you ever wondered why? One of the main reasons is that fish, especially oily fish like salmon, contain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).

THE IMPACT OF OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS ON HEART HEALTH IS ONE OF THE MOST STUDIED AREAS OF NUTRITION SCIENCE AND RESEARCH HAS DEMONSTRATED THAT ITS BENEFITS ARE VERY IMPORTANT

Pregnant women

Fat intake during pregnancy and lactation has a significant impact on pregnancy and on the growth, development and health of the child. A higher consumption of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids is recommended. This increased need for omega-3 fatty acids is due to the fact that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is the predominant fat in the brain and central nervous system, with more than 90% of omega-3 fatty acids in the brain, which affects neurocognitive development. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) are also present, but in very small amounts.

Mercury in Alaska Products

The levels of bioaccumulated pollutants, such as mercury, tend to be higher in the larger predatory fish, such as shark, tuna, swordfish…. No significant levels of heavy metals have been found in Alaska seafood, despite this: it has been determined that the benefits of consuming seafood outweigh the potential risk associated with mercury contamination. Consumers should select fish with low levels of methylmercury, such as wild salmon, black cod, and Alaska herring.

Alaska seafood is rich in selenium, a nutrient that prevents mercury from adhering to tissue and minimizes, if not eliminated, the dangers of this heavy metal.

EPA and DHA

The omega-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic (EPA) are important for the health of the brain, retina, cell membranes, to have a healthy pregnancy and to reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Few foods contain the essential omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA; however, Alaskan seafood is among the best.

Plant foods contain the omega-3 fatty acid ALA, which is found in walnuts, flax, chia, canola, and hemp seeds. Additionally, microalgae-based DHA supplements are also considered a good supplemental source. The body converts 5 to 15% of ALA to EPA and is only able to adequately convert less than 1% to DHA.

Eating foods that contain EPA and DHA, such as Alaskan seafood, is the best way to obtain these essential fats, making them the perfect addition to a vegetable-based diet.

Unsaturated fats

Oily fish like wild salmon, black cod, and herring contain heart-healthy fats, such as unsaturated fats. Fat is necessary to absorb fat-soluble vitamins as important as vitamins A, E, D and K. If the diet does not consist of fat, the body does not assimilate these nutrients well, which translates into a low level of these.

Consuming Alaskan oily fish, along with vegetables and seeds rich in vitamins A, E and K such as red and orange vegetables, green leafy vegetables and sunflower seeds, creates a synergistic effect that allows the body to absorb more easily nutrients.

Iron

Iron is necessary to make hemoglobin, which is a component of red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout the body. The lack of iron can lead to anemia, which can reduce the amount of oxygen that the tissues receive and, with this, symptoms such as fatigue, weakness or lack of concentration appear. In food we can find two types of iron: heme and non-heme. Non-heme iron is found in vegetables, but its absorption varies greatly depending on the food and the physiological needs of the body. The greater the body’s need, the greater the absorption. Heme iron found in foods of animal origin is easily absorbed and the percentage of absorption is higher. To improve iron absorption, you have to combine foods rich in iron with foods rich in vitamin C.

Combining foods rich in vitamin C such as lemon, green leafy vegetables, tomatoes or bell peppers, along with iron-rich Alaskan seafood, creates the perfect synergy of nutrients to enhance iron absorption.

Zinc

Zinc is present in many aspects of cellular metabolism. It is required for the catalytic function of approximately 100 enzymes that play important roles in the immune system, protein synthesis, wound healing, DNA synthesis, and cell division. Some foods rich in zinc are soybeans, legumes, cereals, cheese, seeds, and nuts. However, some vegetables rich in zinc such as legumes, seeds, nuts, cereals, corn and rice also contain a high level of phytate, which makes it difficult to absorb zinc

Alaskan seafood, such as oysters (containing 493% of the Percent Daily Value) and Alaskan king crab (containing 43%), are excellent sources of easily absorbed zinc.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is known as an essential nutrient that is consumed along with calcium to support bone health. In addition, it has other functions. For example, it plays an important role in metabolic pathways, cardiovascular health, and neuromuscular and immune function. Vitamin D is special in that it is the only vitamin the body produces from the sun, and there are very few foods that naturally contain it. The foods richest in vitamin D are oily fish, eggs, beef liver, butter, and red meat. Some foods are sold as vitamin D fortified products, such as cow’s milk, non-dairy milks, juices, breakfast cereals, and margarine.

 Alaska seafood is one of the few foods rich in vitamin D and therefore can be a key supplement to a vegetable-based diet.

Vitamina B12

B12 is an important vitamin for producing healthy blood cells and for nerves to function properly. B12 is only found in foods of animal origin and therefore those who follow a vegan or vegetarian diet, depending on the amount of animal products they consume, should take a B12 supplement. Incorporating Alaskan seafood into a vegetable-based diet is a great way to ensure adequate B12 intake.

Iodine

Iodine is a nutrient necessary for the thyroid and proper bone and brain development. Iodized salt is the main source of iodine in the diet of most people.

However, adequate intake has decreased as consumption of processed foods containing non-iodized salt has increased. Alaska seafood such as cod, salmon, and shrimp are generally rich in iodine, as are other seafood, such as seaweed.

Calcium

Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body, 99% of which is found in bones and teeth. It is also necessary for the nerves and muscles and to control blood pressure and hormone secretion. Beans, nuts, seeds, and bone-containing animal foods are also foods high in calcium, although less well known for this.

A vegetable-based diet that includes Alaskan seafood is the perfect combination for healthy bones.

Calcium depends on other nutrients to be properly absorbed and reach the bones. Some of these nutrients are magnesium, vitamin D, and vitamin K (especially K2).

CANNED SALMON WITH THORNS, TOGETHER WITH LEAF-GREEN VEGETABLES SUCH AS KALE OR RUCULA, ARE EXCELLENT SOURCES OF MAGNESIUM AND VITAMIN K

Selenium

Selenium plays an important role as a necessary element for the production of glutathione, considered the main antioxidant in the body that protects against oxidative stress. Additionally, selenium binds to and safely removes heavy metals, such as mercury, cadmium, and thallium. Some selenium-rich foods come from the sea, such as Alaskan seafood, which are also rich in nutrients like vitamin D, vitamin B12, and the essential omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA. There are also vegetables that are high in selenium such as Brazil nuts, spinach, and cereals that grow in selenium-rich soils. The combination of Alaskan seafood along with a diet rich in vegetables provides the necessary nutrients such as selenium and phytonutrients to reduce oxidative damage and stress in the body.

A few last tips…

1. Combining Alaska Seafood products with a higher-fat content, such as king salmon or black cod, with vitamin A rich foods such as bell peppers, sweet potato, spinach, carrot, or broccoli, can help the body to absorb the vitamin A.
Add roasted broccoli or sweet potato to your meal!
2. Combining Alaska Seafood products with a higher-fat content, such as king salmon or black cod, with vitamin E such as sunflower seeds, almonds, pine nuts, or spinach, can helps the body to absorb the vitamin E.
Add sunflower seeds to a spinach & grilled salmon salad
3. Incorporate Alaska Seafood products into a vegetable-based diet 2-3 times a week to ensure adequate B12 intake to support healthy DNA and nerve function, and to supplement nutrient deficiencies from plant-based diets. Alaska seafood, like the king crab, is especially rich in vitamin B12.
Shellfish can provide up to 150% OF OUR DAILY B12 PERCENTAGE VALUE
4. Consuming canned salmon with bones is a great way to add calcium and vitamin D to a vegetable-based diet. A 125-gram serving contains approximately 221 mg of calcium, which is 22% of the daily percentage value. In addition, canned salmon is very versatile. For your next meal, why not try the salmon burgers, fried rice with salmon and vegetables, salmon fishballs with sweet potatoes or prepare some avocado boats with canned salmon.
TRY SALMON FISHBALLS WITH SWEET POTATOES OR PREPARE AVOCADO WITH CANNED SALMON